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But Cupid, along with rivals including Match.com, e Harmony, Plenty of Fish and My Single Friend, are facing intense competition from agile smaller pretenders.

A raft of sites aimed at office workers have sprung up, all pinstripe suits and messages about being time-poor.

Put on your battle gear because dating has become a minefield strewn with fakes ready to blow up in your face …

they’ll tell you everything you want to hear, but at a price.

Niches based on religion and cultural interests have been joined by those offering a "slap and tickle" specialism in the post-Fifty Shades of Grey era.

“We met online.” The answer to “How did you two meet? No longer do we have to lie about meeting a potential girlfriend or boyfriend in the dairy section of Whole Foods – and thank god because, seriously, no one was ever buying into that lie in the first place. Check out this breakdown of 5 popular platforms, and then make the decision that suites your needs.

(Celebrating the idea, several other websites still link to where the post once lived; visitors are automatically redirected to the Ok Trends landing page.) Could that be because Match.com, a long-time player in the dating game, just purchased Ok Cupid for million in cash?

"Today I'd like to show why the practice of paying for dates on sites like and e Harmony is fundamentally broken, and broken in ways that most people don't realize," Ok Cupid co-founder Christian Rudder opened the "Never Pay" story.

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For comparison, the sixteen-year-old has 1.3 million paying subscribers, a number that Rudder tore apart in his April 7 blog post."Match.com's numbers are just as grim [as e Harmony's]," he wrote.

Meanwhile her fiance is learning Russian with a view of retiring in Ukraine one day.

On April 7, 2010, Ok Trends, the popular Ok Cupid blog that summarizes dating research, ran a story entitled "Why You Should Never Pay For Online Dating." Curiously, that post appears to have been removed from the site.

"They're a public company, so we can get their exact subscriber info from the shareholder report they file each quarter.

Here's what we have from Q4 2009:"Rudder goes on to show why it is exactly that so many profiles on these "pay for dates" sites are "dead," or inactive: Match.com's business model means that the company makes more money by signing up new subscribers than it does by keeping existing subscribers happy.